Make It In The Motherland » August 6, 2021

Daily Archives: August 6, 2021

15 Most Less Spoken Words in the World

There are some English expressions that are just plain weird. Find out fifteen unfamiliar English words. The English language supposedly contains a million words, of which some sound strange, some are written in ways that are unexpected, and some of these words are not taught in English language courses. The following are 15 of the strangest words in English.

1 – QUIRE

There has surely been a time in your life when you wished you could order 24 or 25 sheets of paper in English without having to ask. Correct? Request a quire to solve the problem. This is a less spoken word but also used in some languages that are difficult to learn.

2 – SERENDIPITY

Numerous lists include this word as an untranslatable word. There is something unexpected and happy about it.

3 – GOBBLEDYGOOK

Maury Maverick, a United States politician, coined the term in 1944, when he used it in connection with a text rife with official jargon and particularly complex sentence structures.

4 – SCRUMPTIOUS

Basically, it refers to an especially good morsel or dish which is an onomatopoeia.

5 – AGASTOPIA

The meaning of this word is not difficult if you are familiar with ancient Greek roots. It refers to an intense fascination or love (we could even call it fetishism in this context) for a particular body part. Originally published in Depraved English.

6 – HALFPACE

Undoubtedly, it’s a landing, but it’s not just any landing. Whenever you ascend or descend stairs, you have to turn and take another flight of stairs at the top of the flight.

7 – IMPIGNORATE

What’s the point of making life difficult when it could be easy? The word “to hypothecate” is also used as a verb, but not “to impignorate”. The word certainly makes you want to pawn something because it has all the charm of another age.

8 – JENTACULAR

If you are offered a “jentacular” cup of tea when you get out of bed in the morning, don’t be offended: it means just about anything (in this case, tea) related to breakfast.

9 – NUDIUSTERTIAN

Ndiustertian does not refer to your Armenian friend of that name: it simply means two days ago (the day before yesterday). The day before yesterday, this expression was used a lot more often, but is now disused.

10 – YARBOROUGH

In case you play bridge, then you may already be familiar with this term, which is a useful term for daily life. All the same, you are probably familiar with that unpleasant feeling of having a hand with no cards higher than nine. Those are Yarborough hands.

11 – TITTYNOPE

A scattering of crumbs on one side of the plate, a few grains of rice at the bottom of the bowl, a few drops remaining in the glass are not mere leftovers and dregs. There are tittynopes among them. This is used in English but the different languages used other words to describe these situations.

12 – WINKLEPICKER

You will understand the meaning of a winklepicker perfectly if you ever prepare mollusc skewers using pointy shoes. Still unclear about this? With their sharp point, winklepickers are similar to the utensils used to pry winkles from their shells.

13 – ULOTRICHOUS

The phenomena is always the same: ulotrichous men and women (particularly women) do not want to be ulotrichous, and those (women) who are not would like to be like this. Yes, of course! Curly haired people are called Ulotrichous.

14 – KAKORRHAPHIOPHOBIA

When you suffer from this, then you would rather not see this word in a spelling bee, because it describes the fear of failing.

15 – XERTZ

Did you ever think this would happen? There is no villain in this movie, only the action of guzzling something down in haste.

Published by: